I bet you’d like to read this, but…

It’s nothing really juicy: just some sources I wanted to note down to work into a future post.  Of course, people tried to read it since I had it password protected.

Anyway, I decided to unlock it for the hell of it.  I may have already published some of this already.

But, I did make a comment about blogs being like commonplace books.

 

United States Treaties with the Barbary States, Chris Rodda http://www.talk2action.org/story/2007/9/23/131056/051

History is Powerful: Why the Christian Right Distorts History and Why it Matters, Frederick Clarkson
http://www.talk2action.org/story/2007/3/15/16348/6517

I found this quote about the religious right’s revisionism:

The notion that America was founded as a Christian nation is a central animating element of the ideology of the Christian Right. It touches every aspect of life and culture in this, one of the most successful and powerful political movements in American history. The idea that America’s supposed Christian identity has somehow been wrongly taken, and must somehow be restored, permeates the psychology and vision of the entire movement. No understanding of the Christian Right is remotely adequate without this foundational concept.

But the Christian nationalist narrative has a fatal flaw: it is based on revisionist history that does not stand up under scrutiny. The bad news is that to true believers, it does not have to stand up to the facts of history to be a powerful and animating part of the once and future Christian nation. Indeed, through a growing cottage industry of Christian revisionist books and lectures now dominating the curricula of home schools and many private Christian academies, Christian nationalism becomes a central feature of the political identity of children growing up in the movement. The contest for control of the narrative of American history is well underway.

History is powerful.

That’s why it is important for the rest of society not only to recognize the role of creeping Christian historical revisionism, but our need to craft a compelling and shared story of American history, particularly as it relates to the role of religion and society. We need it in order to know not how the religious Right is wrong, but to know where we ourselves stand in the light of history, in relation to each other, and how we can better envision a future together free of religious prejudice, and ultimately, religious warfare.

We’ve seen how religious beliefs (and other ideologies) inspire people to view others as subhuman, deviant, and deserving of whatever happens to them, including death. It is the stuff of persecution, pogroms, and warfare. The framers of the U.S. Constitution struggled with how to inoculate the new nation against these ills, and in many respects, the struggle continues today. The story goes that when Benjamin Franklin, a hometown delegate to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, emerged from the proceedings, people asked him what happened. His famous answer was “You have a republic, if you can keep it.” To “keep it” in our time, we must appreciate the threat and dynamics of Christian nationalism, and the underlying historical revisionism that supports it. Then we can develop ways to counter it.

change it to guns being a fundamental part of US life like this:

The notion that the American right to keep and bear arms is a central animating element of the ideology of the Right. It touches every aspect of life and culture in this, one of the most successful and powerful political movements in American history. The idea that America’s supposed gun culture has somehow been wrongly taken, and must somehow be restored, permeates the psychology and vision of the entire movement. No understanding of the RKBA movement is remotely adequate without this foundational concept.

But the Armed American narrative has a fatal flaw: it is based on revisionist history that does not stand up under scrutiny. The bad news is that to true believers, it does not have to stand up to the facts of history to be a powerful and animating part of the once and future Armed nation. Indeed, through a growing cottage industry of Second Amendment revisionist books and lectures now dominating the curricula of the media, home schools, and many other forms, Armed nationalism becomes a central feature of the political identity of children growing up in the movement. The contest for control of the narrative of American history is well underway.

History is powerful.

That’s why it is important for the rest of society not only to recognize the role of creeping Second Amendment historical revisionism, but our need to craft a compelling and shared story of American history, particularly as it relates to the role of the military and society. We need it in order to know not how the RKBA movement is wrong, but to know where we ourselves stand in the light of history, in relation to each other, and how we can better envision a future together free of gun violence.

We’ve seen how militarism can inspire people to view others as subhuman, deviant, and deserving of whatever happens to them, including death. It is the stuff of persecution, pogroms, and warfare. The framers of the U.S. Constitution struggled with how to inoculate the new nation against these ills, and in many respects, the struggle continues today. The story goes that when Benjamin Franklin, a hometown delegate to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, emerged from the proceedings, people asked him what happened. His famous answer was “You have a republic, if you can keep it.” To “keep it” in our time, we must appreciate the threat and dynamics of Militarism, and the underlying historical revisionism that supports it. Then we can develop ways to counter it.

Get my point? It’s interesting that the people who urge religious revisionism are urging the change in the understanding of the Second (and Third) Amendments. The Second Amendment was intended as a bulwark against a standing army and militarism.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: