Archive for the ‘French TV’ Category

To pirate or not to pirate–that is the question

Series 7 of Un Village Français aired last year.  France 3 divided it into two parts the same way they did series 6, which is really annoying on several fronts.
UVF 5a
The first being that we find out what happens at the end of Series 5, which ends with an outdoor production of a play being raided by the Gestapo. It is safe to assume that things didn’t work out too well for our thespian members of the Maquis who decided that the show must go on from the picture to the left below.

I imagine Mueller having his troops give them a standing ovation before machinegunning them on the spot.UVF1

But, it’s taken a couple of series to learn their fate.  Not to mention find out what happens to the rest of the inhabitants of Villeneuve.

But there is a big drawback in that it seems this series is hard to find.  Although I did come up with a pirated copy of Series 7. And the subtitles are available at http://www.addic7ed.com.  I don’t feel right buying the pirated copy, but I also don’t like having to pay as much as the “official” English releases can cost.

I can only imagine that France 3 will again release all of Series 7 on DVD after all the episodes have aired.  That will be sometime this autumn.

Not sure I can hold out that long.

(Actually, this is available on a couple of streaming services which specialise in the type of non-US, furren language programming I like: e.g., mhzchoice.com. and Amazon. I’ve signed up for a couple of these services since I don’t watch broadcast TV. I prefer to be my own programming director)

Further info: the First half of Series 7 has been released on disc.  MHz combined the first two series into one making the rest of them a number lower (i.e., 3 is 2, 4 is 3, etc.).  The first half of series 7 has been released as series 6.

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Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges

Joseph Boulogne Chevalier de Saint-GeorgesI want to push my fav character from black history, Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges, since this is black history month.

OK, I want to push my fav character from black history, Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges, since this is black history month, and I just posted that MTV video on the subject.

A short and abbreviated summary of is accomplishments focusing on his musical talents:

Born in Guadeloupe, he was the son of George Bologne de Saint-Georges, a wealthy planter, and Nanon, his African slave. Among his many accomplishments he was a champion fencer, a virtuoso violinist and conductor of the leading symphony orchestra in Paris. During the French Revolution, Saint-Georges was colonel of the Légion St.-Georges, the first all-black regiment in Europe, fighting on the side of the Republic.
Not sure how much about him is factual and how much his reputation has been fictionalised. He has been called the “black Mozart”, which kind of denigrates his abilities as a musician to be compared to Mozart. His musical abilities were eclipsed by his swordsmanship until François Gossec dedicated a set of six Trios to Saint Georges in 1766 that led to the revealation that the famous swordsman also played the violin. Some of the most important musicians in Europe contributed and respected the Chevlier’s musical abilities.  Dedications in Gossec’s and violinist Antonio Lolli concertis that were also dedicated to the Chevalier suggest that Lolli polished his violin technique and Gossec was his composition teacher. There is no basis to the not always reliable François-Joseph Fétis’ claim that Saint-Georges studied violin with Jean-Marie Leclair, however similar traits in technique indicate Pierre Gaviniès as one of his mentors.
In 1769, the Parisian public was amazed to see Saint-Georges, the great fencer, among the violins of Gossec’s new orchestra, Le Concert des Amateurs. Two years later he became its concertmaster, and in 1772 he created a sensation with his debut as a soloist, playing his first two violin concertos, Op. II, with Gossec conducting the orchestra. “These concertos were performed last winter at a concert of the Amateurs by the author himself, who received great applause as much for their performance as for their composition.”
According to another source, “The celebrated Saint-Georges, mulatto fencer [and] violinist, created a sensation in Paris … [when] two years later … at the Concert Spirituel, he was appreciated not as much for his compositions as for his performances, enrapturing especially the feminine members of his audience.”

In 1773, when Gossec took over the direction of the prestigious but troubled Concert Spirituel, he designated Saint-Georges as his successor as director of the Concert des Amateurs. Less than two years under his direction, “Performing with great precision and delicate nuances [the Amateurs] became the best orchestra for symphonies in Paris, and perhaps in all of Europe.

In 1781, due to the massive financial losses incurred by its patrons in shipping arms to the American Revolution, Saint Georges’s Concert des Amateurs had to be disbanded. Not one to let it go without a fight, Saint-Georges turned to his friend and admirer, Philippe D’Orléans, duc de Chartres, for help. In 1773 at age 26, Philippe was elected Grand Master of the ‘Grand Orient de France’ after uniting all the Masonic organizations in France. Responding to Saint-Georges’s plea, Philippe revived the orchestra as part of the Loge Olympique, an exclusive Freemason Lodge. Renamed Le Concert Olympique, with practically the same personnel, it performed in the grand salon of the Palais Royal. In 1785, Count D’Ogny, grandmaster of the Lodge and member of its cello section, authorized Saint-Georges to commission Haydn to compose six new symphonies for the “Concert Olympique.” Conducted by Saint-Georges, Haydn’s “Paris” symphonies were first performed at the Salle des Gardes-Suisses of the Tuileries, a much larger hall, in order to accommodate the huge public demand to hear Haydn’s new works.

 He has been portrayed in fiction. I thought I had posted about him being in the Nicolas Le Floch book/episode, Le dîner de Gueux (Beggars Banquet) where he is the champion of Louis XV in a fencing match. Not sure if some of his life has been “enhanced” by Roger de Beauvoir’s 1840 romantic novel about him called, Le Chevalier de Saint-Georges, or if it is truly as incredible without needing embellishments.  His musical talents are quite impressive, but he was more than just a musician.  The Chevalier was a man of his times in reality the way Nicolas Le Floch is in the fictional series.
Not sure why he is not better known other than he is “French”, but that shouldn’t detract on his reputation in modern times. It sure didn’t when he was alive.
The wikipedia article on him is quite impressive.

 

Who needs guns?

Ok, I know people in the US like to knock the French, but they did resist the Germans.  I’m not sure how similar other resistance and partisan groups armed themselves, but this turned up while doing research to learn more about the Maquis and FFI after watching Un Village Française

The following is from this page

 Everyday tools, turned weapons

PictureAmerican OSS and British SOE agents familiar with popular british weapons like the sten, helped train the french forces of interieur (more organized french offensive), as well as the parisians of the french resistance. Fast learners, the french took their battle to the streets no official contact just some slam bam and run attacks here in their, lowering the enemy moral, and making them more hesitant. Guns weren’t the only weapons the maquis used everyday people took up what they knew, wood axes, kitchen knives and even walking sticks became weapons. The ruthless Vichy helped Germans track down more jewish and communist citizens, so you can say they was a little extra incentive to band together and take back what was rightfully theirs. Brothers, Sisters, husbands and wives, neighbour v. neighbour, everyone with reason to pick up arms didn’t there was as much bloodshed in the city as german v. FFI as there was French v. French, weapons the same tools used just months before for hunting game and birds, used for freedom and liberation, the same used for murder and oppression. Weapons of vichy was there hope that one day this will as be over, that you will just wake up and all it was, was a bad bad dream, one word Hope, hope in their hearts, and a rifle in his hand, and a man or woman, is undefeatable, for no task big or small will stop him(or her), or his(her) dream from becoming a reality

Anyway, despite what gun nuts would like to promote, resistance was not limited by a lack of weaponry.  And having weapons also didn’t guarantee success.

Just ask the Germans!

laresistancegrundtumblr_mr80fcqH7d1spwf52o1_1280

Un village français series 6 DVDs releasing in October!

Amazon France has the release date as 28th of October.  No product data available about this release.Un village français

It seems that there are a couple of networks that have run this series in the past with subtitles: TV5Monde and Mhz WorldviewTV5.ca ran (runs?) the series in French in Quebec. it’s been officially released in Germany and Sweden (besides France). This series is unofficially on Youtube as well.

I’m sort of surprised that this hasn’t made it to a larger audience.  It’s on a couple lot of lists of “must see” French TV. It is probably the best of the lot (with Engrenages/Spiral coming in a close second).  I mentioned Aleesandra Stanley’s New York Times Article: The Elusive Pleasures of French TV Series– ‘Spiral’ and 3 Other French Shows Worth Seeking Out in another post.

IOffer has copies of this show with subtitles, but I would not suggest doing that as the copies are not “official”. I would guess that they are most definitely bootlegs.  On the other hand, it has long been a gripe with me that the rightsholders do not do their best to make sure a popular programme like this sees the type of release it deserves: both on broadcast and DVD sales.
There is at least an Australian version of series 1 that was released on 11 March 2015. It’s a region 4 release.  Unfortunately, it only appears to be the first series at this time.

Anyway, there is at least one more series to deal with the aftermath of the war since this series deals with the liberation of France.  This series appears to start with an announcement that Paris has been liberated.  I can tell that things will get messy  from the part of the first episode I watched (collabos and resistance will spar it out in post-War France).UVF 5a Actually, a lot of things are going to get tied together in this series, which means that you need to watch the whole thing to have some idea of what is going on.

Alas, the ending of Series 5 may end up being is one of those things that you have to use your imagination.  My vote is that Müller made sure the Maquisards received a standing ovation from his troops before machinegunning them (I hope that’s not too much of a spoiler).  The picture here is a clue to what was happening.

(Yes, I thought about posting a clip of the ending, but that would really spoil it for you.  I’m hoping I have not given too much of a spoiler as is.
I also edited this to get a better version of the ending scene.)

Plus d’un village français Saison 6

I was going to do the title in Franglais (e.g., More un village français Season 6), but thought better of it. Anyway, here are the teaser trailers for the series.   These trailers give you a good idea of what a compelling series this is:

This series looks really good, but people in France have only seen the first half of season 6 (and 7 is supposedly in the pipeline as well).  No hope for the DVDs coming out yet.

Pas encore!

Jonesing for Un village français saison 6.

There are a lot of reasons I am feeling this way from the seriously good cliff hanger ending to Season 5.  I have my theories as to what happened, but I await the “official” end to that scene–or some sort of similar resolution. Toss in the Americans have landed and are coming to Villeneuve (Season 6 starts with the Liberation of Paris). The first six episodes of Season 6  aired last November, but TF3 hasn’t aired the last 6 episodes.  They said they were going to do it in June, but no joy.  Even then, the wait for the DVDs of Season 6 to come out is going to be even more difficult.  Not to mention that TF3 says there is also a Season 7!

The upshot of this is that there are spoilers out there such as a teaser trailer for Season 6 and pictures of what goes on in the season. Not to mention loads of synopses. But, imagination is not as good as the show.  I really want to know what goes on especially since there is a scene of Müller digging his own grave, literally.  I think he is saved by the Americans (“Maintenant aux mains des Américains, Heinrich et Hortense sont séparés.”). I’m having enough of a time waiting for Season 6.  I hope that Season 7 is released quickly after and that the DVDs make it onto the market quickly as well.  In the mean time, I have to rewatch the first five series. This is one stinking good soap opera! I seriously hope it makes it to an English speaking audience since it is probably one of the best done TV shows about the Second World War (Colditz and Secret Army being other candidates).

More French puns

Les_Revenants_1_Yara_Pilartz_articleI was rewatching “Les Revenants” and there’s a scene in the first episode where Camille says something like “J’ai crevé“, which can be taken a couple of ways.

  1. She’s really tired
  2. She’s dead

I’m not sure if the writers intended the double entendre, but it was funny when I caught it.

For those who are not familiar with the series, Camille died in a bus crash four years before the show “begins” and reappearing in the “present”.  Naturally, her family is a little shocked to see her.
While I like the English language a lot, I am finding that French does have some fun words to play with (also see baiser).   Baiser would have been useful for the person who was a little over affectionate with his SO at the airport drop off lane:

Pourquoi ne allez-vous pas ailleurs si vous voulez baiser votre petite amie?

Somethings just don’t translate well to English.