Archive for the ‘Pet’ Category

Bermuda is not for the poor

I decided to check out the dog friendly hotels in Bermuda.

While they may be dog friendly, they are not wallet friendly. We are talking 4 figures at the least expensive.

And that’s just for a night.

Of course, the Rosewood is near where the billionaires live. So, prices are commensurate with the neighbourhood.

I guess if you can afford the accomodation, you can probably afford the private jet to get you to Bermuda. Which also means that you can probably find some other place to stay as well.

Unless you want to stay in a hotel.

The rest of us have to leave the dogs back home.

Going to Bermuda???

I am seriously thinking about going to Bermuda for Lobster Season, which goes from the First of September to the 31st of March 31. I would like to take my dogs, which used to be impossible.

Now it’s only difficult.

Only a couple of hotels allow dogs: The Hamilton Princess & Beach Club along with the Rosewood Bermuda. I see which one I would go to if I do take my dogs. Unfortunately, both of them are away from civilisation. So, getting a Twizy would be a definite, but not a problem since the dogs would ride in the back.

Anyway, it’s still in the planning stages, but it is something I am considering. Also, considering Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine or the Gaspé. Those might be more doable with dogs

See:

https://www.gotobermuda.com/article/visiting-bermuda-pets

https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/pet-travel/by-country/pettravel-canada

The Warning signs of Pet Cancer

Maybe because I know quite a few veterinary Oncologists, or because I am a very conscientious pet owner, I tend to worry about Laci’s health.

The 10 Warning signs of pet cancer:
1. Abnormal swellings that persist or continue to grow
2. Sores that do not heal
3. Weight loss
4. Loss of appetite
5. Bleeding or discharge from any body opening
6. Offensive odor
7. Difficulty eating or swallowing
8. Hesitation to exercise or loss of stamina
9. Persistent lameness or stiffness
10. Difficulty breathing, urinating, or defecating

Contact your veterinarian if your dog or cat displays ANY of these signs.

Source The Animal Cancer Foundation

If you think about it, pet cancer is related to human cancers. The Canine Genome Sequencing Project at the Broad Institute successfully mapped the genome of a boxer named Tasha in 2005. The map of the genome has been used to confirm that many of the same genes involved in dog cancers are also involved in human cancers (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/guide/dog/). I’d like to think that treatment of pets will result in better treatments and possibly a cure for human cancers.

I’m in good company since the National Cancer Institute (NCI) believes so strongly in this vision that the NCI Comparative Oncology Program was created in response. Currently, the Canine Comparative Oncology Genomics Consortium (CCOGC), a multidisciplinary consortium of scientific leaders from both human and veterinary oncology, is working to explore the broader implications of the canine genome sequence for human cancer research.

And you wonder why I prefer dogs to humans?