The perils of internationalism

I know Charles Owen helmets are expensive. These prices gave me sticker shock until I realised they were in AUS$!

charlesowen

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More glamping and campaign furniture

Sporting_Accessories_Product_Categories_J_and_R_Guram_-_2018-02-11_19.45.32The sun may never set on the British Empire in  my mind: especially since deep down I am a Victorian-Edwardian Gent at heart. Not to mention I did get some to the tag ends of the empire growing up.

Anyway, I came upon a purveyor of campaign furniture whilst looking for shooting accessoriesSporting_Accessories_Product_Categories_J_and_R_Guram_-_2018-02-11_19.45.59 (read cheap gun oil bottles of the type a period gent would have had stashed in his shotgun case for those driven shoots for his servant to keep his bespoke shotguns in proper order). Even better the merchant is in Inja and has all the goodies an Empire builder would desire.

Who cares about the guns: he’s got Safari Equipment! While the campaign furniture selection isn’t as extensive as I might like, they do have quite a few nice things to keep the tent from looking too much like one shops at a surplus store.
Campaign_Furniture_&_Equipage_Product_Categories_J_and_R_Guram_-_2018-02-11_19.53.33
Ok, I need to add a screen cap of the Campaign Furniture section to show it’s pretty good, but not as good as it probably would have been during the good old days of Empire.  The time when someone couldn’t go abroad, or to battle without taking all the comforts of home: literally.

While not in the heart of Piccadilly or St. James, J & R Guram can be found on the web at:
http://jandrguram.com/

Check out their favourite links while you are there for the best of Empire and creative anachronism.

I leave you with this image:
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The US needs to get in touch with its convict immigrant heritage

I am upset about an ignorant statement made by someone in authority about US immigration.  Although, not sure how much “authority” can be given to someone who is director of the US tenement museum. The comment was along the lines of people whose ancestors came here and became citizens somehow are similar to the “dreamers” of today.

Part of this was based on the fact that immigration laws weren’t that strict up until the late 19th-early 20th Century; however there were still immigration laws.  That is a flawed argument for a myriad of reasons: the basic one being that laws change.  You can’t legally try a case which happened in the past using current law or judge a modern case by outdated law.

Another issue at work here is the national myth that people came here for a better life, which wasn’t always true.  The US needs to get in touch with its convict immigrant heritage since, besides slaves, not everyone came here for a better life.

Prior to the US War for Independence, the US was the dumping ground for England’s convicts:

As the 17th century drew to a close, lawmakers sought a less harsh punishment that might still deter potential offenders; penal transportation with a term of indentured servitude became the more common punishment. This trend was continued by the Transportation Act 1717 (16 Geo. 3 c.43), which regulated and subsidized the practice, until its use was suspended by the Criminal Law Act 1776. With the American Colonies already in active rebellion, parliament claimed its continuance “is found to be attended with various inconveniences, particularly by depriving this kingdom of many subjects whose labour might be useful to the community, and who, by proper care and correction, might be reclaimed from their evil course”. This law would become known as the Hard Labour act and the Hulks act for both its purpose and its result. With the removal of the important transportation alternative to the death penalty, it would in part prompt the use of prisons for punishment and the start of prison building programs. (source)

Of course, the situation here was solved by Australia, but that is an aside. The term “indentured servant” sounds a lot better than convict. it also plays into the aspirational aspect of the US myth: “your ancestors came to America as a Servant in hopes of a better life.”

That plays out a lot better than your ancestors were shipped to the colonies to escape the noose.

Of course, it also puts a different light on early American immigration in that blacks weren’t the only people shipped to the Colonies against their will.  And do some research into indentured servitude in the Early North American Colonies if you are going to try and argue that it wasn’t as bad as being a slave.

Of course, trying to draw a distinction between slavery and indentured servitude is useful if you want to divide people up by race. Add “Bacons Rebellion” in Virginia to the reading list.

But the real issue here isn’t slavery or race as much as it is the aspirational aspect of immigration. As long as the myth is that people came here for a better life, one might “forgive” a person for breaking the law because they want a better life for their family.  On the other hand, Australia used to have cheap fares for immigrants up until recently, but now has incredibly strict immigration laws. Is there a lesson to be learned here?

Personally, I don’t think an unlawfully present person’s life happens to be better since they know they can be deported. The “dream” if there really is one is that people will someone ignore that the unlawfully present person is violating immigration law: even if it doesn’t come with strong penalties.

But the bottom line is all about the dream.  Maybe it’s time for a strong dose of reality.

People really don’t get what being European really means.

Prehistoric Brit

Scientists have reconstructed his appearance based on 3D scans of the skull and information from the man’s DNA and came up with the above image.

This changes this beliefs about Early Europeans:

It was initially assumed that Cheddar Man had pale skin and fair hair, but his DNA paints a different picture, strongly suggesting he had blue eyes, a very dark brown to black complexion and dark curly hair.

The discovery shows that the genes for lighter skin became widespread in European populations far later than originally thought – and that skin colour was not always a proxy for geographic origin in the way it is often seen to be today.

The Money Shot here:

Tom Booth, an archaeologist at the Natural History Museum who worked on the project, said: “It really shows up that these imaginary racial categories that we have are really very modern constructions, or very recent constructions, that really are not applicable to the past at all.”

Yoan Diekmann, a computational biologist at University College London and another member of the project’s team, agreed, saying the connection often drawn between Britishness and whiteness was “not an immutable truth. It has always changed and will change”.

I really wish Pioneer Little Britain Europe hadn’t banned me from their face book pages because I would post this every place I could.

See also:

No, Holly, this is what makes a liberal’s head explode

From an earlier time.

So politically incorrect on so many levels.

Golliwogs Fox Hunt

Posted 05/02/2018 by lacithedog in hunting, race, race card, race relations, racism, Uncategorized

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J’ai rejoint l’Alliance Française

There are a few reasons for this. The main one is to take the DELF examination.  The DELF or Diplôme d’études en langue français  (which literally means Diploma in French Studies in English) is an official certification given by France’s National Ministry of Education to non-native French speakers after completing a set of proficiency tests. It is valid for life and is recognized anywhere in the world.

OK, why would someone who is fluent in French want to take this test? First off, France (and Canada) requires one show proficiency for citizenship. That should make a lot of immigration hawks ears perk up since they would like people to speak English. Of course, being able to speak the main language SHOULD be a requirement for citizenship. I say that because nationhood is somewhat based on shared culture.  Even if the shared culture is a mixture of other cultures.

Secondly, it proves that I can indeed speak French. Not that having lived in Belgium and spending time in other francophone countries doesn’t show that.  On the other hand, Brexit has made the search for EU citizenship a priority.  Even though I probably would have no issue with German citizenship, there are a few negatives to that one as a possibility.  The Poles says I am not ethnically Polish (Remember the map of Europe’s Borders? I come out as being British, French/Belgian, Czech/German, Polish/German, and just plain German (Rhineland Pfalz). Although, the Czech/German is more German (Saxony) than Czech.

Anyway, the Alliance Française seems to be the way to go.  It’s also probably something I should have done a while back, but my French language skills never needed to be certified until Brexit.

Be careful what you wish for

I make no bones about it: I hate cars.

I far prefer public transport to cars, but I currently live between two homes (the secret to a happy marriage–live separately).  I have too much crap to take on the train: toss in they are now getting crowded. Loads of other whining.

Likewise, public transportation has the same problem: especially with two dogs. Even when they in bags since you take up way more space than is acceptable. Slightly more acceptable with that much crap on a train, but not when the train is packed out.

I’m happy as heck that driving is being discouraged, but there are now too many issues to car ownership to make it worthwhile (I’ve taken up leasing the past few years for a bunch of reasons).  There’s congestion tax, parking, traffic, etc.

I live in a city which was not designed for automobile traffic and it shows. The average speed over a century ago was about 8 mph.  My new car tells me my average speed and it’s 12 mph in the city! Of course, that’s due to traffic and traffic controls.  Not to mention streets which were meant for horses, not cars.

Seriously, a trip of about 16 miles takes me an hour!

Anyway, I am currently mulling over getting rid of the car (again) for Zipcar since that takes care of most of the issues other than slow speed.

I should be happy that car ownership is being discouraged. Not to mention I’ve done pretty everything I can to reduce my carbon footprint.

But I’m not for the time being.